review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Books, Contemporary, Movies, Novel, Review, Young Adult

 

:: author:: Stephen Chbosky :: published: 2010 :: my rating: 4/5 :: genre: novel :: young adult :: contemporary :: goodreads

Hello my lovely friends!

I’m trying something new today and posting a movie and book review all rolled in one post! I recently watched The Perks of Being a Wallflower, something I had been meaning to do for some time, and because I had finished the book fairly recently as well, I decided to kill two birds with one stone. Lets go ahead and get started 🙂


Synopsis from goodreads:

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Charlie is a freshman.

And while he’s not the biggest geek in the school, he is by no means popular. Shy, introspective, intelligent beyond his years yet socially awkward, he is a wallflower, caught between trying to live his life and trying to run from it.

Charlie is attempting to navigate his way through uncharted territory: the world of first dates and mix tapes, family dramas and new friends; the world of sex, drugs, and The Rocky Horror Picture Show, when all one requires is that perfect song on that perfect drive to feel infinite. But he can’t stay on the sideline forever. Standing on the fringes of life offers a unique perspective. But there comes a time to see what it looks like from the dance floor.


My Review: (No Spoilers)

The first time I read this book, was during my pre-teen years when I can’t say I was emotionally or mentally prepared to broach the topics presented. However, after revisiting the book, I was better able to grasp and appreciate the topics and issues that were being addressed. If there was were issues with the book, it would be the following.

  1. There was too much going on in the book. I felt like Chobsky tried too hard to include too many topics, and often times it felt overwhelming. Although this could have been done on purpose, I still felt myself having to stop periodically and just think. 
  2. I had to remind myself that Charlie was only a freshman and that this book took place in high school. 
  3. I had trouble understanding why Charlie was unable to identify any emotion other than sadness and regret. Although this is how depression works, I felt that this cycle of whining and inability to understand his situation to be monotonous.

However, I loved how real the book was. How it illustrated mental issues, and the realistic perspective into the struggles adolescents have.

First lines in the book:

“August 25, 1991
Dear Friend,

I am writing to you because she said you listen and understand and didn’t try to sleep with that person at that party even though you could have. Please don’t try to figure out who she is because then you might figure out who I am, and I really don’t want you to do that. I will call people by different names or generic names because I don’t want you to find me. I didn’t enclose a return address for the same reason. I mean nothing bad by this. Honest.

I just need to know that someone out there listens and understands and doesn’t try to sleep with people even if they could have. I need to know that these people exist.

The movie, was equally as good, and I found myself falling in love with Emma Watson and surprisingly, I felt like Charlie became so much more real to me. The movie, however, expounded upon the drug culture, and I found myself thinking that this seemed to be more of a college setting than that of high school. This could be in part because my high school experience was so much different, but it was difficult to grasp that these kids were merely high schoolers, as they had so much terrible history behind them.

Characters:

I believe that Chobsky’s characterization and descriptions of the characters were the highlights of the book, and what made the book so lovable. By the end of both the book and the movie, I felt as if I knew each character at a personal and deep level. Each were multifaceted and brought so much dimension to the book.

Charlie is the embodiment of all that adolescents are afraid to admit and be. Innocent and honest, he works as the perfect narrator, providing insight into all the ugly and terrible things that accompany growing up, while also showing the beauty of friendship and love. Suffering from childhood trauma, and depression, Charlie is simply trying to make his way through high school as a normal student. Not only does Charlie have an ugly past that always threatens to ruin his social life, Charlie finds himself to be smarter, and more insightful than the rest of his class. Although his complaints and inability to function correctly in society grew to be annoying, I could understand and empathize with his plight.

In the movie: Charlie is everything I imagined him to be in the book. I had trouble grasping what sort of exterior Charlie exuded at school, and the movie helped me to realize that even with his conflicting interior, he was just that kid in school that we never talked to. This prompted me to realize that these people suffering from problems are all around us.

Contrasting sharply to Charlie’s naivety is Sam. Patrick and Sam take Charlie under their wings, and teach him about life. I believe that it is Charlie’s interactions with these characters that develop him, and expose him to the reader. I won’t say much about the supporting characters, as I found myself enjoying reading and learning about them the most.

The Plot:

There are a series of love stories in this book, all very different from each other. I loved this aspect of this book, as the reader is shown the pain and hardship that accompany any sort of relationship. There were relationships that didn’t work out, a LGBT relationship, one without love, and an abusive one as well. This helped me realize that it’s not always happily ever, and that in the world, there is always a lot more under the surface.

Though I won’t say much about the plot, as I found the characters to be what made the book amazing, I never was bored, and found myself devouring each page to discover more about each character.

Final Thoughts:

This story provided moments to cry, learn and empathize. This coming to age novel taught me a lot about mental health, as well as allowed me to realize that some of the thoughts and issues I was having was not exclusive to me. I was able to better grasp the value of friendship, and what love is. I recommend this to everyone and anyone!

Both the book and movie were wonderful, and I was grateful to have the opportunity to reread and watch.


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Have you watched or read either The Perks of Being a Wallflower? What did you think? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

review: To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han

Books, Contemporary, Novel, Review, Romance

:: author:: Jenny Han :: published: 2014 :: my rating: 3/5 :: genre: novel :: romance novel :: contemporary :: goodreads

Hello my lovely friends!

Just another shameless plug: my twitter account @_kimmiegg is up and running! I’d love to catch up on your daily lives, and am looking forward to meeting you guys through twitter.

This book has been on my TBR list for a while, due to the plethora of amazing reviews about this book. Furthermore, after learning that it was a book based on a Korean-American family, I immediately included it in my eBook haul. I know many of you have read this book, but I can’t wait to share my thoughts on why this book doesn’t deserve the five stars I wanted to give it with you 🙂

(Since many of you have read this book, I have included a few could-be-spoilers. None divulge main plot twists or details. Read on at your own risk.)


Synopsis from goodreads:15749186

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is the story of Lara Jean, who has never openly admitted her crushes, but instead wrote each boy a letter about how she felt, sealed it, and hid it in a box under her bed. But one day Lara Jean discovers that somehow her secret box of letters has been mailed, causing all her crushes from her past to confront her about the letters: her first kiss, the boy from summer camp, even her sister’s ex-boyfriend, Josh. As she learns to deal with her past loves face to face, Lara Jean discovers that something good may come out of these letters after all.


My Review:

The aspect about this book that I loved was how relateable and realistic Lara Jean (the main character) was. Her struggle with finding love, and maneuvering through relationships, though often immature, were still always in character. I appreciated how Jenny Han included dialogue that was not only there to fill up space, but to provide insight into each personality and really develop each character into something real.

However, there were aspects of this book that made me question the hype.

  1. There didn’t seem to be any TRUE romance throughout the book. Especially because the relationship that permeated throughout the book was simply one that was supposed to be fake. I felt as if the various relationships presented in this book served to show Lara’s development. Although the majority of this book was devoted to her interaction with boys, I felt as if no real spark was found between any of them.
  2. I disliked how each sister seemed to have a romantic interest in their older sister’s significant other. Sure, it’s better to like your sister’s boyfriend, but not to crush after him… And mutually, if you’re dating someone, please don’t crush on her younger sister.. That’s just so, wrong…

The Characters

Each character is the typical archetype of a middle class family dealing with some sort of problem. In this case, it’s the death of a mother. Starting with the typical overworked father who loves his daughters and is always trying to find ways to give them the love and attention they deserve while trying to figure them out. I loved the attention and effort this father put into raising his family of three girls. Then there’s Margot, the oldest, most mature responsible and organized sister. She is the one who has kept the family together and running smoothly, and it is her departure that throws this book into motion. Kitty is the youngest of the group, and naturally plays one of the most vital (and predictable) parts in this story. Lastly, we have Lara Jean. The protagonist of this story.

Lara Jean is a sheltered, romantic teen trying to make it through the most important years of high school. Not only is she facing the hardships of exceeding her sister’s footsteps, but she has an issue with not ever truly expressing her feelings for others, but rather, choosing to lock them away in a box. In a way, I appreciated this side of Lara, as I found myself being able to relate to her inability to open up and share how she felt with others.

Then of course, we need to add in a troubled friend who always sticks up for the main character. Chris is the typical “this is not a phase mom” character who  helps Lara through her difficult times. To thicken the plot, we add Genevieve, the beautiful, flawless mean girl who adds drama to the story. And her perfect boyfriend, Peter, who enters Lara Jean’s life with a lot of emotional baggage.

The Plot

Although the characters were not very unique and this story was lacking in that department, the plot was very unique. There were times I really had to wonder what was going to happen next, and what choice Lara Jean was going to make. I was also constantly curious as to how each character would react to the actions of others. Because the characters are quite archetypal, I thought I would be able to predict how each of them reacted… Surprisingly, my conjectures were proved false.

Although these small aspects of the plot really made the book, I failed to find much romance. As stated before, I felt as if this book explored more of Lara’s development through failed relationships. When before, Lara measured her ability and worth against her sister Margot, we see her beginning to break free of that. I believe that was the best part of the book, and what made it so readable/relateable.

Ending Thoughts

This book was a light, fun read that I did finish in one sitting. It was hard to put down, and although there were parts that I wish had been dealt with better, I found myself really enjoying this quirky fun romance. *SPOILER*  I was disgusted by how Lara so easily cheated on her sisters boyfriend. Especially after she learned that they had had sex. *SPOILER* All in all, I wish that she had taken more control over her own life, although from my own personal experiences, I can relate to how difficult that could be.

This book was definitely a fun read, but I can’t give it the five star rating that I want to give it for the above reasons. Although I can’t say that I agreed and loved the book 100%, I will be reading the sequel as I have to know how Lara ends up!


Quotes

“I do this to feign confidence, because the more I fake it, the more it’s supposed to feel true.”

So, this is me all the time, and it really works! Sort of like the smiling theory that if you force yourself to smile, you’ll become happier.

“It’s scary when it’s real. When it’s not just thinking about a person, but, like having  a real live person in front of you, with , like, expectations. And wants.”

Love is a hard concept to grasp, and I think that often we read or watch stuff about it and think we know what love is. That we have a tangible definition only to find that explanation falling apart when we actually fall in love.

“A hundred years ago eighteen-year-old guys were out there fighting wars with bayonets and holding a man’s life n their hands! They lived a lot of life by the time they were our age. What do kids our age know about love and life”

This was said by Peter, and I just had to agree. Context is such a vital part in creating expectations.


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Have you read any books by Jenny Han? What do you think about the book? Have you ever written any love letters yourself? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

review: Pearl by Deirdre Riordan Hall

Books, Contemporary, Novel, Realistic Fiction, Review, Romance, Young Adult

:: author: Deirdre Riordan Hall :: published: 2016 :: my rating: 4/5 :: genre: novel :: romance novel :: realistic fiction :: goodreads

Hello my lovely friends!

First off, I’d like to announce that I have finally taken it upon myself to make a twitter account! Make sure to follow @_kimmiegg to stay caught up 🙂

Anyways, I’m back today with a review on a book I was not expecting to read. I had not heard of this book, nor had it been on my TBR list, but upon accidentally stumbling upon it, I found it to be a fun read. Maybe it was the cover, or my infatuation with pearls in general… Whatever the case, this was a easy, light read that I ended up enjoying.


Synopsis from goodreads:

Run fast and run far, unless you’re fearless. Unless you’re courageous. I’m not, but I’d like to be.

Pearl Jaeger is seventeen and homeless after drugs, poverty, and addiction unraveled the life she shared with JJ, her formerly glamorous rock star mother.

This moment of happiness is fleeting; someone will take it from me.

When tragedy brings a chance to start over at an elite boarding school, she doesn’t hesitate. Yet the only salvation comes from an art teacher as troubled as Pearl, and she faces the stark reality that what she thought she wanted isn’t straightforward.

I trace the outline of my reflection in a window. I am no more than a replica of my mother. This is not the self-portrait I want to paint.

Through the friendships she forms at school—especially with Grant, a boy who shows Pearl what it means to trust and forgive—she begins to see a path not defined by her past. But when confronted with the decision to be courageous or to take the easy way forged by her mother’s failures, which direction will Pearl choose?


 My Review: (no spoilers)

From the start, this book was jarring. It begins with Pearl sneaking back home, in order to avoid the wrath of her intoxicated mother. What follows is a detailed description of the mentally and physically exhausting act of taking care of a once famous rock star, drug addicted mother while discovering ones identity. This book caused me to deliberate on how much of my life was the result of my upbringing (nature v nurture anybody?), and the resilience someone needed in order to break free from their parent’s bonds.

Characters

The part that I could relate to with Pearl, the protagonist in this book, was her constant confusion about guys and life in general. I felt as if there was dimension to her, which I appreciated. Brought up in an unstable household, with no permanent residence or father, Pearl constantly finds herself moving to accommodate her mother’s new boyfriend or drug addiction. Furthermore, Pearl struggles to root her identity in her mother’s legacy and demise. I found Pearl’s inner conflict of hating her mother, and wishing to hold a part of her very realistic and painful.

Pearl’s relationships are all a tad complicated. Because she is constantly moving, she has no steady friends, and it isn’t until she joins the elite boarding school that she finds people to regularly socialize with. These relationships help fortify what we know about Pearl’s personality, and I believe the author did a great job of showing Pearl’s multifaceted character through these relationships. One character that I just could not stand was Sola, the mother hen that was the embodiment of Pearl’s mother.

Plot

The plot flowed very easily, and I was surprisingly ok with the ending. Although it was a bit too perfect for me, there were still some loose ends, and it was nice to see where Pearl ended up. I found Pearl’s situation, oftentimes to be also too perfect at times. Things would always work out in ways that wouldn’t normally have worked in real life. Throughout the book, I never struggled with being bored, or confused, which was nice.

HOWEVER, this book is riddled in drugs and sex. It doesn’t stop with her mother, but seems to follow Pearl everywhere. No matter how much Pearl hates the drug culture, and how much the drug culture has hurt her, she isn’t able to remove herself from it. At times, I had to remind myself that Pearl was still in High School and not in college. This could be due in part that this takes place in a boarding school, but also because every student seemed to be obsessed with drugs and making out. Although this concept is essential to the ending of the book, I found it frustrating sometimes to see her following exactly in her mother’s footsteps.

Ending thoughts:

Overall, I thought this was a nice, easy read (I finished in two sittings), and it did keep my attention. The biggest aspect that I disliked THE MOST about this book was how cheating was portrayed as a way to make a relationship stronger. Coincidence or not, I had just finished reading this book, when the lovely Reg from She Latitude posted her Top Ten Turn Off’s in the Book. (Most of which I agree with) Number eight, on her list is cheating. I find cheating in real life and books alike to be frustrating. When the two parties get back together, I’m always infuriated, and when the allusion is made that a relationship can get stronger though such a betrayal, you can imagine how livid I am. This aspect of the book can be seen as almost the sole reason I dropped a star.


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Have you ever read Pearl? What did you think? What is a book you will be reading next? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Review: The Time Traveler’s Wife

Books, Novel, Review, Romance

the time travelers wife

:: author:Audrey Niffenegger:: published: 2013 :: my rating: 2/5 :: genre: novel :: romance novel :: speculative fiction :: goodreads

Hello my lovely friends,

It’s been a while since I’ve done my last book review, but then again, I’ve been caught up in a whirlwind called life. As you all know, the last book I was currently reading was The Time Traveler’s Wife. Though I finished it a month ago, I’m shamefully uploading the review now. I have to say, I needed time to mull over the book, and was hoping to actually watch the movie, to maybe see what the craze was about. Well here goes!


Synopsis from goodreads:

Audrey Niffenegger’s dazzling debut is the story of Clare, a beautiful, strong-minded art student, and Henry, an adventuresome librarian, who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was thirty-six, and were married when Clare was twenty-three and Henry thirty-one. Impossible but true, because Henry is one of the first people diagnosed with Chrono-Displacement Disorder: his genetic clock randomly resets and he finds himself misplaced in time, pulled to moments of emotional gravity from his life, past and future. His disappearances are spontaneous and unpredictable, and lend a spectacular urgency to Clare and Henry’s unconventional love story. That their attempt to live normal lives together is threatened by something they can neither prevent nor control makes their story intensely moving and entirely unforgettable.


My Review (no spoilers):

Honestly, I was expecting a lot more from this book, especially because it is a well known title, and has brought raving reviews from some. The premise of the book is interesting, and I must say that the idea behind the plot is great. A love that surpasses all time? Great, but I felt this book didn’t really develop that idea. I found that this book was hard to get through, not emotionally engaging, and doomed from the start.

Characters

Although this book jumps back and forth in time, the characters voices are the same throughout their entire lives. It seems as if Clare is always scared, always waiting for a man who is never there during her critical moments. Henry is constantly complaining about his predicament, and the author never fails to remind the audience of the hardship this couple endures due to his tendency to appear in a different time period, naked. Although Niffenegger attempts to paint a passionate love story between the two, it was overshadowed by Clare’s constant need for Henry, and their constant attempts to keep his time traveling a secret. Niffenegger’s mode of illustrating the passion between Henry and Clare is through sex, and it is difficult to grasp their intimacy when every tender moment must be through this act.

Furthermore, both the characters have lives that are extremely difficult to relate to, as both are brought up in familial situations that are far from ordinary. The characters were also obsessed with bands and artists, which is fine, but the constant mention of band names and artists was distracting, and seemed like a pathetic attempt for the author to try and show her hipster side.

“I won’t ever leave you, even though you’re always leaving me.”

What angered me the most was Clare, and her willingness to wait, and save herself for a man that is a womanizer and drug addict. I believe that quote in and of itself shows how willing Clare was to throw away her life and wait for the only man she ever had in her life. Because Henry tells her that they will be married some day, she finds herself waiting, and waiting and waiting for a man that ultimately can’t be there for her in the end. I found this draining, and the unrealistic expectation  on her hand was disappointing.

Plot

The characters in this book made it difficult for me to engage in the plot and enjoy the book. Because I was unable to relate, or understand both characters, their actions that made up the plot, often seemed silly and boring. I felt as if lots of needless sub plots were added throughout this book that did not particularly add to the book, but made it treacherously long. Often, the subplots seemed unresolved.

This book had potential, and I believe would have been greatly improved if all the characters were given more chances to develop and grow. The premise of the book was exciting, and I was definitely intrigued, only to find myself repulsed by their love story, and the lack of closure and conflict. The end did semi redeem itself, though I do believe even that could have been executed in a better manner.


 Quotes

Although the book overall, was not to my taste at all, there are some quotes that I did love.

“Don’t you think it’s better to be extremely happy for a short while, even if you lose it, than to be just okay for your whole life?”

I feel as if every moment in your life should be filled with intense happiness, and that mediocrity is silly. However, to be extremely happy for a short while, and live in fear and sadness for the rest, also does not seem like a healthy alternative.

“Everything seems simple until you think about it.”

Now isn’t that the truth. This quote is short, and a tad humorous, as we tend to overthink and thoughts become convoluted in our brains.


Not a favorite, and will not be reading again soon. This book was incredibly difficult to get through, and I hope to watch the movie just to see what the craze is about. I’d only recommend for those that enjoy slow reads, and reading about borderline abusive relationships.

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What types of romances do you enjoy reading? Is there one you would recommend me? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Tag: 3 Days, 3 Quotes. Day 3

Books, Novel, Tag

3days3quotes

Hello my lovely friends!

This is it! This is the end of this 3 day tag. I hope you all have enjoyed these short posts that showcase a quote from a book I’ve been enjoying. I’d like to once again, thank Monique @ That Wild Soul for tagging me  and if you still haven’t checked her blog out, you’re really missing out.


THE RULES:

1. Thank the person who nominated you
2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
3. Nominate three new bloggers each day


https://i0.wp.com/media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/db/89/46/db89467860cfa1c78a845aec981e2330.jpg

I just loooove the adjectives, and the way this line rolls off my tongue. Pride and Prejudice became a classic favorite of mine, and I feel as if this is representative of the eloquent language Jane Austen uses throughout the book. Plus, lately, I’ve been on cloud nine, so this describes me perfectly.


I NOMINATE:

Donna @ ChocolatenWaffles

Ola @ Ola Reads Books

The Orangutan Librarian @ The Orangutan Librarian


What did you think of this tag? Are there any pressing quotes you feel you need to share? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

August To Be Read

Books, Novel, To Be Read

august tbrHello my lovely friends 🙂

It’s time for my August TBR! Although this month will be filled with moving into college, frantically buying dorm essentials (what’s the difference between comforters and duvets anyways?), and trying to get my life together as always. Thus, I will only be putting four books on this list, although my goal for this month is seven.


:: book: Half of A Yellow Sun :: author: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie :: published: 2015 :: genre: historical fiction:: goodreads

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Synopsis from goodreads:

With effortless grace, celebrated author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie illuminates a seminal moment in modern African history: Biafra’s impassioned struggle to establish an independent republic in southeastern Nigeria during the late 1960s. We experience this tumultuous decade alongside five unforgettable characters: Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old houseboy who works for Odenigbo, a university professor full of revolutionary zeal; Olanna, the professor’s beautiful young mistress who has abandoned her life in Lagos for a dusty town and her lover’s charm; and Richard, a shy young Englishman infatuated with Olanna’s willful twin sister Kainene. Half of a Yellow Sun is a tremendously evocative novel of the promise, hope, and disappointment of the Biafran war.

This book was featured on Naz @ Read Diverse Books in her “Black Women As Heroes And Role Models – A Reading List” post. I loved this post because it brings awareness to the wide array of books we must read in order to open our minds and expand our wisdom. The synopsis definitely sucked me in, and I can’t wait to get my hands on this book! Thanks Naz 🙂


:: book: Written in the Stars :: author: Aisha Saeed:: published: 2015 :: genre: novel:: goodreads

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Synopsis from goodreads:

This heart-wrenching novel explores what it is like to be thrust into an unwanted marriage. Has Naila’s fate been written in the stars? Or can she still make her own destiny?

Naila’s conservative immigrant parents have always said the same thing: She may choose what to study, how to wear her hair, and what to be when she grows up—but they will choose her husband. Following their cultural tradition, they will plan an arranged marriage for her. And until then, dating—even friendship with a boy—is forbidden. When Naila breaks their rule by falling in love with Saif, her parents are livid. Convinced she has forgotten who she truly is, they travel to Pakistan to visit relatives and explore their roots. But Naila’s vacation turns into a nightmare when she learns that plans have changed—her parents have found her a husband and they want her to marry him, now! Despite her greatest efforts, Naila is aghast to find herself cut off from everything and everyone she once knew. Her only hope of escape is Saif . . . if he can find her before it’s too late.

First off, the cover of this book is beautiful. Second off, this book explores the Pakistanian culture and the lives of first generation citizens. The clashing cultures make for an interesting read as one girl battles to find her identity. Plus who doesn’t love a love story that surpasses all constructs of love?


:: book: A Passionate Man :: author: Joanna Trollope :: published: 2000 :: genre: novel:: goodreads

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Synopsis from goodreads:

The Logans were an enchanting and admirable couple. Archie had snatched Liza from her own engagement party to someone else, wooed her, swept her off to his father in Scotland, and finally married her. Now bedded firmly into country life-three children, Archie the village doctor, Liza a teacher, everything comfortable, funny, affectionate,—they awaited the arrival of Archie’s father, the brilliant Sir Andrew Logan, a widower for over thirty years.

When his city-clean Rover stopped in the drive, Sir Andrew was not alone. Beside him was a golden lady in caramel suede, a warm, witty, desirable widow whom everyone—except Archie—adored at once. Archie saw his father’s mistress as the worm in the bud of his perfect life—a life that was to be wrenched apart before he and Liza could re-create their world.

This is a book I grabbed during my Free Book Haul, and have been itching to read. I really love novels that revolve around character development, and show the interactions and relationships between characters. Although maybe not as fast paced as other books, I think this will be a fun read before bed.


:: book: A Thousand Pieces of You :: author: Claudia Grey :: published: 2014 :: genre: novel:: goodreads

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Synopsis from goodreads:

Cloud Atlas meets Orphan Black in this epic dimension-bending trilogy by New York Times bestselling author Claudia Gray about a girl who must chase her father’s killer through multiple dimensions.

Marguerite Caine’s physicist parents are known for their groundbreaking achievements. Their most astonishing invention, called the Firebird, allows users to jump into multiple universes—and promises to revolutionize science forever. But then Marguerite’s father is murdered, and the killer—her parent’s handsome, enigmatic assistant Paul— escapes into another dimension before the law can touch him.

Marguerite refuses to let the man who destroyed her family go free. So she races after Paul through different universes, always leaping into another version of herself. But she also meets alternate versions of the people she knows—including Paul, whose life entangles with hers in increasingly familiar ways. Before long she begins to question Paul’s guilt—as well as her own heart. And soon she discovers the truth behind her father’s death is far more sinister than she expected.

A Thousand Pieces of You explores an amazingly intricate multi-universe where fate is unavoidable, the truth elusive, and love the greatest mystery of all.

This cover though! I know you’re not supposed to judge a book by it’s cover, but honestly, I can’t stop staring. I’ve really been craving for a good revenge story, so naturally A Thousand Pieces of You seemed like a good pick. Also, multiple dimensions? New versions of oneself? More secrets? Yes please!


So, here is my short TBR for this month! What are some books you can’t wait to read? What’s your goal number of books for this month? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Book Tag: 3 Days, 3 Quotes. Day 2

Books, Novel, Tag

3days3quotes

Hello my lovely friends!

I’m back with Day 2 of the 3 Days, 3 Quotes tag! I’d like to thank Monique @ That Wild Soul for tagging me and I encourage all of you to pay her blog a visit.

*Shameless plug* as you all know, I’ve recently launched a new meme Wordless Wednesday on my blog! Check out the page, and do try to participate 🙂 I greatly appreciate all your support and encouragement.


THE RULES:

1. Thank the person who nominated you
2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
3. Nominate three new bloggers each day


https://i0.wp.com/culturestreet.com/depot/620--330--uploads-2013-12-Daily-quotes-5-December.jpg

Who doesn’t love The Book Thief? I just absolutely adore this quote because of the emphasis it places on the importance of the memories they made that day, rather than the lack of materialistic things they had. Even in times of dire straights, this family learned to love, and feel joy within each other.


I NOMINATE:

Sammie @ Bookshelves and Biros

Jouska @ The Jouska Blog

Erin @ Quillable


If there was one quote you could show your countries leader, what would it be? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Book Tag: 3 days, 3 quotes. Day 1

Books, Novel, Tag

3days3quotes

Hello my lovely friends!

First of all, thank you Monique @ That Wild Soul for tagging me, she has an amazing blog so everyone go check it out! I’d also like to thank Blanca @ A Girls Voyage for commenting and notifying that I was tagged.

Lately, I haven’t been receiving notifications or pingbacks for when you all tag me in your posts. Because of this, and because I was in Korea and unable to read all your posts, I have been unable to see if I was tagged in anything. For the time being, please comment, or link back to an old post in order to notify me that I’ve been tagged. Sorry for the inconvenience.


THE RULES:

1. Thank the person who nominated you
2. Post a quote for 3 consecutive days (1 quote for each day)
3. Nominate three new bloggers each day


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My first quote is from To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. This quote just hits home with me, and reminds me to always keep multiple perspectives in mind. Plus, we must always keep in mind that how others act, or treat us is not always our own fault.


MY NOMINEES

Eleanor @ Real Tasty Pages

Martin @ A Pretty Wonderful Book

Kristen @ A Bookish Introvert


Why do you enjoy quotes? Do you hang them around your room? Let me know in the comments below 🙂

Thursday Quotables: 7.7.16

Books, Novel, Thursday Quotables, Uncategorized

//book: The Razor’s Edge // author: W. Somerset Maugham // genre: novel // goodreads

Hello my lovely friends! First off I’d like to mention that I am in Korea right now (this is a scheduled post) and I will not be able to reply to your comments as frequently as I’d like. I’ll still be checking up on my blog often, so don’t forget to say hello!

I picked up this book as a reading assignment for one of my classes. I was able to learn an amazing amount about finding one’s identity, the gift of solitude, and the detrimental effects of monetary objects. This book also showed me the importance of surrounding oneself with wisdom rather than temporary pleasures, status and wisdom. I believe this book really dealt with topics that are pertinent even today.


Synopsis from goodreads:

Intimate acquaintances but less than friends, they meet and part in postwar London and Paris: Elliot, the arch-snob but also the kindest of men; Isabel, considered to be entertaining, gracious, and tactful; Gray, the quintessence of the Regular Guy; Suzanne, shrewd, roving, and friendly; Sophie, lost, wanton, with a vicious attractiveness about her; and finally Larry, so hard and so trustful, lost in the world’s confusion. Their story, one of Somerset Maugham’s best, encompasses the pain, passion, and poignancy of life itself.

My favorite aspect of this book was how well developed each character was. They all had features that were relateable. They will make you laugh, and cry, astonish you and disappoint you. The writing is almost lyrical, and the plot is simple, yet complex. There is nothing about this book I could complain about as I was enraptured by every page. This book is very much like The Great Gatsby in that the narrator is detached yet very involved.

I love it when I’m able to fall in love with a character and make them my role model. Although I realize the impossibility of becoming the protagonist in this book, Larry, there are so many facets of him I’d love to emulate. The peace and serenity he possess, along with his continence and wisdom. Larry truly is one to be impressed by.


 “Nothing in the world is permanent, and we’re foolish when we ask anything to last, but surely we’re still more foolish not to take delight in it while we have it. If change is of the essence of existence one would have thought it only sensible to make it the premise of our philosophy.”

See why I love Maughm’s writing? It’s so beautiful, lyrical and compact. Plus he addresses a very important topic. Lately, in my workplace, I’ve been noticing how people are adamantly against change. They believe that happiness stems from permanency and the ability to control every aspect of their lives. Larry’s former girlfriend, wishes for him to be permanent, present and normal. Isabel fails to realize the destructiveness of stability, and trusting in permanency.

“You see, money to you means freedom; to me it means bondage.”

I believe that this quote so perfectly captures one of Larry’s best qualities. Not preoccupied by status and glory like the rest of his friends, Larry grants more value to the deeper aspects of life such as knowledge and peace. His expedition to find the meaning to life, although difficult, eventually becomes the core of his identity and being.

“Unless love is passion, it’s not love, but something else; and passion thrives not on satisfaction, but on impediment.”

I love this unconventional view on love, and throughout the book, this line manifests itself over and over again. I believe this is even pertinent in today’s day and age, and is a concept often overlooked and not understood. Isabel struggles with finding love, especially as she values a comfortable life and status over passion. The way Maughm confronts this crises is unique and refreshing.

The sun shone goldly upon them. Something in Isabel’s immobility attracted my attention, and I glanced at her. She was so still that you might have thought her hypnotized. Her breath was hurried. Her eyes were fixed on the sinewy wrist with its little golden hairs and on that long, delicate, but powerful hand, and I have never seen on a human countenance such a hungry concupiscence as I saw then on hers. It was a mask of lust. I would never have believed that her beautiful features could assume an expression of such unbridled sensuality. It was animal rather than human. The beauty was stripped from her face; the look upon it made her hideous and frightening. It horribly suggested the bitch in heat and I felt rather sick.”

On the topic of love, this is an interesting in that Isabel is painted as a very beautiful, alluring person who has managed to win the hearts of many well accomplished men. This tender moment when she gazes into the man she wasn’t able to marry, would normally be seen as tender and beautiful. However, the disgust the narrator feels illustrates the concept of love and how physical and primitive it is. (Although we hate to think of such a beautiful topic in this manner)

“It’s a long, arduous road he’s starting to travel, but it may be that at the end of it he’ll find what’s he’s seeking.”

Isabel doesn’t understand why Larry could possibly want to leave the comforts of stability and life, and seek wisdom and understanding. To her, the way to live a fulfilled life is to be physically content.Larry, on the other hand, undertakes a journey that could possibly lead him nowhere, yet his aspiration to know and understand truth is beautiful.

This book triggered a lot of thinking on my part, and has helped me to evaluate my values, thoughts and beliefs on love, accomplishments and death. I believe that this book must be read by a mature reader who won’t only appreciate the book for it’s plot. Truly a magnificent book, it’s an amazing read.

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Have you read The Razor’s Edge? What character in a book have you tried to emulate in the past? and why? Let me know in the comments below! 🙂

Thursday Quotables: 6.23.16

Books, Novel, Thursday Quotables, Young Adult

//book: Stargirl // author: Jerry Spinelli // genre: novel // young adult //  goodreads

Hello my lovely friends! Today, I will be taking quotes from one of my childhood favorite books. This book was my go to read, and I remember reading it over, and over, and over again, without ever getting bored! I loved the free spirit the girl possessed, and was enchanted by her personality. ALSO, THIS BOOK IS ABOUT TO BE TURNED INTO A MOVIE! It is yet to be announced when it will be in theaters. (I’m super excited… can you tell?)

Synopsis from goodreads:

From the day she arrives at quiet Mica High in a burst of color and sound, hallways hum “Stargirl.” She captures Leo Borlock’s heart with one smile. She sparks a school-spirit revolution with one cheer. The students of Mica High are enchanted. Until they are not. Leo urges her to become the very thing that can destroy her – normal.

More than a love story, this novel deals with the pains of being “normal” and the suppressing power of trying to fit in. Stargirl possesses the magic of being unique, kind and grateful. Her quirky personality, captures the interest of the entire school, until the school discovers that her spirit is “too different”. Leo, is then forced to choose between a girl he loves and the in-crowd.

The most beautiful part about Stargirl, is her ability to appreciate and connect with others. She memorizes birthdays, names and small things that others would probably ignore. She is willing to do most anything for anyone. Stargirl is comfortable with being an outcast, and only attempts to change in order to appease the boy she likes (Leo).

She was elusive. She was today. She was tomorrow. She was the faintest scent of a cactus flower, the flitting shadow of an elf owl. We did not know what to make of her. In our minds we tried to pin her to corkboard like a butterfly, but the pin merely went through and away she flew.

This is such an accurate description of the essence of Stargirl. She was truly a girl that no one could understand, nor pin down. In their attempts to mold her into something “normal” she would simply slip away, and continue to be who she wanted to be. Of course, the school’s inability to understand who she was, ended up causing her downfall.

He stared at me. “She liked you, boy.” The intensity of his voice and eyes made me blink.
“Yes,” I said.
“She did it for you, you know.”
“What?”
“Gave up her self, for a while there. She loved you that much. What an incredibly lucky kid you were.”

Not only was Stargirl genuine and true to herself, she was able to understand the true meaning of love and the sacrifice that accompanies it. Instead of worrying about what others thought, Stargirl placed a higher importance in those that she loved, and those that loved her. In an attempt to please Leo, Stargirl gave up herself. This is the biggest sacrifice that one can make. I believe that Stargirl not only showed the importance of being unique, but of giving love.

I’m erased. I’m gone. I’m nothing. And then the world is free to flow into me like water into an empty bowl…. And… I see. I hear. But not with eyes and ears. I’m not outside my world anymore, and I’m not really inside it either. The thing is, there’s no difference between me and the universe. The boundary is gone. I am it and it is me. I am a stone, a cactus thorn. I am rain. I like that most of all, being rain.

When Stargirl demonstrated to Leo the power of meditation, I was amazed by her tranquility and tried it again and again and again. I must say, I never succeeded in becoming nothing, but I was able to understand the power Stargirl possessed to hold such power over herself. She was able to become nothing, one with nature and the universe. Her connection with nature is very apparent and beautiful throughout this book. And I think we all need a glimmer of that in our lives.

“She taught me to revel. She taught me to wonder. She taught me to laugh.

I hope we all meet someone like Stargirl one day. Someone who teaches us that it’s ok to stand out, to be different, to love, to laugh. The impact she made on Leo’s life is amazing, and to realize how easily he gave her up cautions us to be mindful and more understanding of the people around us. Sometimes the one we push away, is the one who has shaped our identity the most.

This book truly helped me to realize the detriments of conformity and convinced me to be kind, even if it may be unconventional. The power of peer pressure, and the scary truth behind conformity was also brought to my attention, and each time I put down the book, I was reminded to always be kind, thoughtful and genuine to each and every person I met. This is a must read for anyone of any age, as it deals with important topics in a manner that is engaging and thought-provoking.

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